Category Archives: Partners and Teams

The primary goal of these books is to increase the functioning and impact of partnerships and/or teams.

The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups

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Citation for Book: Coyle, D. The Culture Code: The Secrets of Highly Successful Groups. Bantam; 2018.

Recommended by:  Kate Smith, ksmith@cop.ufl.edu

Star Rating (1-5): 4

Review: In The Culture Code, Dan Coyle seeks to outline three skills demonstrated by strong cultures: Building Safety, Sharing Vulnerability, and Establishing Purpose. You’ll likely recognize these themes from other leadership books you’ve read, repackaged here with fun and engaging stories about comedy troupes, Zappos.com customer service and the restaurant scene in New York City.

As a relatively new faculty member, I was intrigued by some of the questions Coyle recommended asking of groups and wanted to take the questions back to the groups I am a part of as a faculty member. “Are we connected? Do we share a future?” I also appreciated his idea of “collision-rich spaces”, physical places where we can run into others and share ideas and build relationships. Does your workplace have collision-rich spaces?

One exercise Coyle discusses is to have your group rank their priorities. “Most successful groups end up with a small handful of priorities (five or fewer), and many, not coincidentally, end up placing their in-group relationships- how they treat one another- at the top of the list. … If they get their own relationships right, everything else will follow.” This struck me as revolutionary… Do I see other faculty around me as part of my team? Do I see my success as wrapped up in their success? Additionally, where would “students” or “patients” fall on our list of priorities? Lots to think about…

While there were several good stories and lessons in the book, overall, Coyle failed to answer some of the questions I was asking when I picked up the book: What is culture? How do we build it? How do we change it? I’ll have to keep reading to learn more about those things.

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Filed under Instructor Resources, Partners and Teams

Power through partnership: How women lead better together

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Citation for Book: Polk, B. & Chotas, M.E. (2014). Power through partnership: How women lead better together. Oakland, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.

Recommended by:  Kerry FIerke, Ed.D., University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy

Star Rating (1-5): 3 (liked it)

Review:

The book Power through partnership: How women lead better together, Polk and Chotas describe the differences between men and women as partners.  More importantly, there aren’t many women business partner role models to show the way.  The authors describe several benefits of healthy female partnerships — flexibility, confidence, freedom, steady support, mutual accountability and happiness.   There are stories of other women who have navigated the partnership realm.

According to Polk and Chotas “the intense give- and take of partnership is a natural fit for the interpersonal, collaborative leadership skills women so often possess and tend to undervalue rather than appreciating them for the meaningful tools they are” (34).  When looking for partners, there are three qualities 1) complementary skills, talents, and interests; 2) shared values; and 3) compatibility.  These were the most consistent qualities found in the partners interviewed for the research.

The book also covers areas of decision making, risk taking, and leveraging conflict amongst partners.  It explains how women can find their own creativity outside of the partnership (known as the rubber band theory).  The authors share ways that one can take advantage of having a partner “freedom to be yourself, the incredible support, the confidence, the equity and power that can result through it, and the ability to operationalize big goals, knowing there are at least two accountable partners to keep track and do the work.”

Power through partnership shares perspectives on partnerships through real-life examples.  Stories from women who have navigated the partnership realm as artists, musicians, business owners, non profit, and other various examples.  These stories highlight the positive experiences and challenges that can take place with today’s demands on women, including ways to conduct them. The book provides a start of a foundation on how to begin the process of partnerships, an example of women working together.

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Training Camp: A Fable About Excellence

Gordon, J. Training Camp: A Fable About Excellence. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2009.

Recommended by Jenelle Sobotka

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Filed under Character/Values, Inspirational, Partners and Teams

Soup: A Recipe to Nourish Your Team and Culture

Gordon, J. Soup: A Recipe to Nourish Your Team and Culture. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

Recommended by Jenelle Sobotka

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Winning

Welch, J. Winning. New York, NY: Harper Collins Publishers, Inc., 2005.

Recommended by Jenelle Sobotka

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Filed under Partners and Teams, Personal Development

Power of 2: How to Make the Most of Your Partnerships at Life and Work

Wagner, R. and Muller, G. Power of 2: How to Make the Most of Your Partnerships at Life and Work. New York, NY: Gallup Press, 2009.

Recommended by Kristin Janke, U of MN, CoP

Star Rating: 3 (Liked it)

Review:   Partnership is incredibly important to leadership.  In particular, partnerships may be vital in helping to manage weaknesses.  I’ve been looking for a book that provides an overview of the elements of a successful partnership.  This book fits that bill.  I’ve recommended it to students that are working in extended partnerships.  When both partners have read it and discussed the concepts, students have reported that it is helpful.  Students have reported really liking the examples of partnerships.  I found some of the example to be repetitive of other books I’ve read, otherwise I would have probably personally rated it higher.

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Filed under Partners and Teams, Pharmacy Student Electives-Advanced

The Anatomy of Peace: Resolving the Heart of Conflict

Arbinger Institute. The Anatomy of Peace: Resolving the Heart of Conflict. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2008.

Recommended by Kristin Janke, U of MN, CoP

Star Rating: 3 (Liked it)

Review:  This book is another easy-to-read and digest fable from the Arbinger Institute.  Since 2007, we’ve had students and pharmacists read Leadership and Self Deception to rave reviews.  Although some content is repeated in this book, I found the repetition to be reinforcing and minimal.  There is plenty of new content.  For those that want to get a bigger picture perspective on conflict,  I found it to be a logical extension to Leadership and Self Deception.

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Filed under Partners and Teams, Personal Development, Pharmacy Student Electives-Advanced